Markdown Tutorial

April 17, 2014

You might be asking yourself, why should I learn Markdown syntax? The answer is, it makes writing for the web a whole lot easier. Markdown allows you to write using an easy to learn syntax, and convert it to X/HTML. You simply write a Markdown document, save it as a .md file, and use something like Jekyll to generate static X/HTML files. The popular CMS, Ghost, also uses Markdown syntax to write articles. In this tutorial, I’ll go over the basics of Markdown, and link to the full syntax at the end of this article. Without any further ado, let’s get started!

Let’s start with something easy, like writing some headlines.

This is headline 1

This is headline 2

This is headline 3

And so on, and so forth.

The actual Markdown syntax looks like this.

# This is headline 1

## This is headline 2

### This is headline 3

You may also underline the word like this to achieve the same result.

This is headline 1
==================

This is headline 2
----------------==

Personally, I prefer the former, as I find it neater to write.


Now, I’ll show you how to emphasize and bold text.

Here is an example of emphasized text.

This text is emphasized

And here is bolded text.

This text is bolded

The actual Markdown syntax to do this looks like this.

*This text is emphasized*

**This text is bolded**

Pretty simple stuff really.


Let’s move on to making bulleted, and numbered lists.

Here is a bulleted list.

  • Bullet point 1
  • Bullet point 2
  • Bullet point 3

And I could go on and on, however I won’t bore you with that.

Here is what the actual Markdown syntax looks like.

* Bullet point 1
* Bullet point 2
* Bullet point 3

You can also interchange the * for a “+” or a “-“.

Now, on to the number list!

Here is an example of a number list.

  1. Number 1
  2. Number 2
  3. Number 3

Again, so on so forth into infinity.

Here is what the actual Markdown syntax looks like.

1. Number 1
2. Number 2
3. Number 3


Another important thing to know, is how to quote text.

The previous examples have actually all been in quotes, so I don’t think we need another example for this one.

Here is the Markdown syntax to quote text.

> This is a quote

You can also do a block quote like this.

> This is a block quote
>
> As you see, you just keep adding > in front of the text
>
> Like so


Time to move on to writing some links, shall we?

Here is an example of a link.

Link Text

In this case, the link goes to https://google.com.

The Markdown syntax used in the example above looks like this.

[Link Text](https://google.com "Google")

Another way to link is to use what is called Reference links.

Here is an example of a reference link.

Reference link

This link points to https://yahoo.com, and has the title Yahoo!.

The actual Markdown syntax looks like this.

[Reference link][] 

[Reference link]: https://yahoo.com "Yahoo!" T

Another way to write a reference link is like this.

[Reference link][1]

[1]: https://yahoo.com "Yahoo!"

Both will achieve the same result.


Moving on now to linking images.

To link an image is a lot like a normal text link. It’s nearly the same syntax.

Here is an example of an image link.

Example

Here is what the actual Markdown syntax looks like.

![Example](/location/to/image/image.ext)

Again, very simple!


One last tip, you can also write raw X/HTML directly into your Mardown document! It’ll just be parsed as such without conversion.


I believe that wraps up my basics tutorial. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading it, and learned a thing or two about the Markdown syntax. If you’d like to continue your journey; I highly recommend reading the full syntax guide on the creator of Markdown’s site, Daring Fireball.


Source: Daring Fireball

IMO: Windows 10 and Incompatible Applications

## First, Happy New Year Everybody!Now to the article.I frequently read the latest discussions on the [Windows subreddit][1], however rec...… Continue reading

I'm Back

Published on December 03, 2015

IMO: The Sony Hackers Have Won

Published on December 19, 2014